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compensation whether it is through healthcare dollars or the conversation about maintenance and equipment. you never hear about our reliance on the contractors and how that has become commonplace in the new normal for the defense establishment. i would like your thoughts on that. >> i am ignorant of the relevant issues. i would like to see what studies there are that get an answer to how much of the trend to contracting out has saved money and how much it has not because it is a mix. the answer is important because the trend has gone far, probably too far. >> an anecdote in support of that -- a former colleague of mine who ended up in charge of the training command in afghanistan said contractors would not do what is not in the contract. there is no substitute for a volunteer soldier or marine who will do whatever the job takes. whatever danger or risk is involved. there is some routine civilian type functions that would be better performed by civilians and contractors. we are trying to get contractors in the compaq zone -- combat zone would suggest we have gone too far. >> while we typically
now. jay hancock, thank you for joining us to talk about the taxes and fees as part of the new health-care law. appreciate your time. you are on twitter. that is all for "washington journal." >> stephanie has been active in democratic circles. she was the national director for howard dean's 24 -- 2004 election. she helped to unseat an 18 year republican incumbent. stephanie also managed the campaign of senator frank and i and minnesota. she defeated norm coleman, correct? she is a graduate of c-span.o [indiscernible] university in minnesota. she has a lot to say and then we will field questions from all of you. thank you, stephanie. >> thank you all so much for coming out. good morning. again, my name is stephanie schriock, president of emily's list. as mentioned, i grew up in butte, montana, where my heart and soul still reside. special thanks to the national press club for setting the solemn. it really is an honor for me to be here today. for those of you who do not know as much about emily's list, emily's list has been around for 27 years. we are solely committed to electing pro-choice
in general, but certainly policymakers. i am just a single-minded about comprehensive health-care reform. i know is not particularly popular in west virginia, but it's ok. because of my fingerprints are all over it, i know is good and i know it will benefit west virginia more than any other state. it is so incredibly complex, not just the 17% of gdp has people like to say, but it is so complex and involved and interests of people, nuances that we just had to do something about it. everybody talked about it, nobody had done anything about it. i worked with the pepper commission is for two years, we rode a perfect long-term care policy and acute care policy and it was dead on arrival. i worked hard for the clinton health care bill, and it did not make it. this one came along, and i was determined to help make it happen. for the simple reason that should be a right and not a privilege. the affordable health care act is the way the 32 million americans in more than 300,000 of west virginians will be able to afford health insurance, truth, honesty, and we did not have the money to do it all, by
Search Results 0 to 2 of about 3